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Press Release

Clarence Stewart’s Canvasback Chosen for Waterfowl Stamp

February 28, 2005

A canvasback duck painted by Clarence Stewart of Brewton is the winner of the 2005 Alabama Waterfowl Stamp Art Contest. The winning artwork will adorn the 2006-2007 Alabama Waterfowl Stamp. Although Stewart had entered the contest in previous years, this is the first time one of his renderings has won the competition.

First runner-up was a pair of flying Ross’s Geese by Steven Burney of Town Creek. Second runner-up was a pair of buffleheads by David Nix of Cottondale. Third runner-up was a pair of redhead ducks by H. Scott Grammer of Hartselle, and fourth runner-up was a blue-winged teal by Everett Hatcher of Birmingham.

Entries were judged on suitability for reproduction as a stamp, originality, artistic composition, anatomical accuracy, and general rendering. The designs were limited to living species of North American migratory ducks or geese, and winning species from the past three years – wood duck, ringneck and Canada goose – were not eligible subjects for the 2005 contest.

The artwork was publicly displayed and judged by a panel of experts in the fields of art, ornithology, and conservation. Representing the field of art was George Taylor, an artist from Montgomery. Craig Brantley, president of the Mobile Chapter of Ducks Unlimited, represented the field of conservation. Representing the field of ornithology was Bob Reed, president of the Alabama Ornithological Society.

The law requires that any waterfowl hunter 16 years of age and older must carry a valid Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp – or duck stamp – signed in ink across the face. Like the federal migratory waterfowl stamps, state issued stamps are popular with collectors.

The artwork competition for the Alabama Migratory Waterfowl Stamp design is held each year in February and is open to Alabama residents only. For additional information, visit the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Web site at www.outdooralabama.com or call the Wildlife Section at 334-242-3469.

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